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Hearing Tests

We Offer Home Visit Hearing Tests all across London & Southern England

& Hearing Tests in Clinic

We help you understand your hearing loss and find the best solutions tailored to your needs.

Schedule a Home Visit or In Clinic Appointment

We Will Contact You Within 2 Hours

Monday-Saturday 10AM - 6PM

0208 341 0588

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Let us bring back your hearing with these 3 steps

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1. Schedule a hearing test to identify any hearing loss:

A registered audiologists will conduct a thorough hearing test in your home or in clinic.

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2. Consult with our experienced audiologists who will explain your results and recommend the best solution for your unique needs

A registered audiologist will then explain all of your results to you and help you understand your hearing loss better. We understand that every individual has unique hearing needs, so we will work with you to find the best hearing aid for you, personalised depending on lifestyle and budget. 

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3. Start your 60-day free hearing aid trial to experience the benefits of a hearing aid

We are confident in the effectiveness of hearing aids, which is why we offer a 60-day free trial period.

During this time, you can experience the benefits of improved hearing firsthand and determine if the hearing aid is the right solution for you. If you are not satisfied with the hearing aid, you can return it with no obligation.

Understanding your Hearing Loss

We can provide a thorough hearing and diagnostics test from the comfort of your own home or in clinic. It is important to fully understand your hearing loss and its potential causes and treatments. That's why we're dedicated to providing informative and educational content that can help you make informed decisions about your hearing health. Explore the different types of hearing loss, its potential causes, and the available treatment options we have available.

Please call us to arrange a home visit hearing test or in clinic with our experienced audiologists.

Our independent audiologists will suggest the best solution for your hearing loss.

Audiologist Hearing
  • What is age-induced hearing loss?
    Age-induced hearing loss, also known as presbycusis, is the gradual loss of hearing that occurs as people age. Presbycusis typically affects the high-frequency range of sounds first, which can make it difficult to hear speech clearly, particularly in noisy environments. As the hearing loss progresses, it can also affect the ability to hear lower frequency sounds. Some potential causes of age-induced hearing loss include the accumulative effects of noise exposure over time, genetics, and changes in the blood supply to the inner ear. Age-related hearing loss is the most common type of hearing loss in the UK, affecting approximately 70% of adults over the age of 70. The prevalence of age-related hearing loss increases with age, affecting approximately one in three adults over the age of 65. Men are more likely to experience age-related hearing loss than women. Common causes of age-related hearing loss include genetics, exposure to loud noise over time, and changes in the blood supply to the inner ear. Early intervention and treatment with hearing aids can help to mitigate the effects of age-related hearing loss.
  • The three different types of hearing loss
    1. Conductive hearing loss occurs when sound is blocked from reaching the inner ear. This can be caused by earwax build-up, fluid in the middle ear, a perforated eardrum, or abnormal bone growth in the middle ear. 2. Sensorineural hearing loss is caused by damage to the hair cells in the inner ear or the auditory nerve. This can be caused by aging, exposure to loud noise, certain medications, or a hereditary condition. 3. Mixed hearing loss is a combination of both conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, meaning there is a problem in both the outer or middle ear and the inner ear.
  • What are the symptoms of hearing loss?
    Here are some of the most common symptoms of hearing loss. Difficulty understanding speech, particularly in noisy environments. Needing to turn up the volume of the television, radio, or other devices to hear them properly. Frequently asking people to repeat themselves. Feeling like people are mumbling or not speaking clearly. Having trouble hearing high-pitched sounds, such as birds chirping or the beeps of a microwave. Having trouble hearing sounds in the presence of background noise, such as in a restaurant or at a party. Having difficulty following conversations when multiple people are speaking. Avoiding social situations or conversations because of difficulty hearing or understanding. Tinnitus, or ringing, buzzing, or other similar noises in the ears or head. Feeling fatigued or stressed after prolonged periods of listening or straining to hear. Finding clarity in loud environments It is important to note that these symptoms can vary depending on the severity and type of hearing loss a person is experiencing, and that some people may not experience any symptoms at all. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms or are concerned about your hearing, it is recommended to speak with an audiologist.
  • Link between hearing Loss and other health conditions
    Hearing loss can have correlations with other health problems, such as: Cognitive decline and dementia: Studies have found a strong correlation between hearing loss and cognitive decline, as well as dementia. This could be because the brain has to work harder to process sounds when hearing is impaired, which can lead to cognitive decline over time. Additionally, social isolation due to hearing loss has been shown to increase the risk of developing dementia. Cardiovascular disease: There is some evidence that suggests a link between hearing loss and cardiovascular disease. Research suggests that the same factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease, such as poor circulation and damage to blood vessels, can also contribute to hearing loss. Diabetes: Hearing loss has been linked to diabetes, with studies showing that people with diabetes are more likely to have hearing loss than those without the condition. It's thought that high blood sugar levels can damage the blood vessels in the inner ear, leading to hearing loss. Depression and anxiety: Social isolation and communication difficulties due to hearing loss can lead to feelings of depression and anxiety, which can have negative impacts on mental health and well-being. Falls and balance problems: Hearing loss has been associated with an increased risk of falls and balance problems, likely due to difficulties with spatial awareness and maintaining balance. It's worth noting that while these correlations exist, they don't necessarily mean that hearing loss directly causes these health problems. Rather, they may share common risk factors or an increase risk with a hearing loss.
  • Are there any lifestyle changes I can make to prevent hearing loss?
    Some lifestyle changes to prevent hearing loss may include: Avoiding exposure to loud noises, Wearing ear/hearing protection in noisy environments Maintaining good ear hygiene
  • Can hearing loss be cured?
    In some cases, hearing loss can be cured if the underlying cause is treatable, such as an ear infection or build-up of earwax. However, in most cases, hearing loss is permanent and cannot be cured. Fortunately, there are treatment options available that can help bring your hearing back.
  • How is hearing loss diagnosed?
    Hearing loss is typically diagnosed through a hearing evaluation, which includes a physical examination, hearing tests, and a review of medical history. The audiologist may also order additional tests, such as an MRI or CT scan, to rule out any underlying medical conditions.
  • What is noise-induced hearing loss?
    Noise-induced hearing loss is a type of sensorineural hearing loss that occurs as a result of exposure to loud noises over an extended period of time. This can include work environment exposure to noise (such as working in a noisy factory), recreational exposure (such as attending concerts or using headphones at high volumes), or a single exposure to an extremely loud noise (such as an explosion). Noise-induced hearing loss typically affects the high-frequency range of sounds first, which can make it difficult to hear consonants and understand speech. It can also cause tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, and can make it difficult to hear in noisy environments. Noise-induced hearing loss is the second most common type of hearing loss in the UK, affecting approximately 20% of adults. The prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss is highest among people who work in noisy environments, such as construction sites or factories. Exposure to loud music through headphones or at concerts and festivals can also cause noise-induced hearing loss. Common symptoms of noise-induced hearing loss include difficulty understanding speech, tinnitus, and an increased sensitivity to noise. Noise-induced hearing loss is preventable through the use of hearing protection, such as earplugs or earmuffs, and by limiting exposure to loud noise. We have solutions to bring your hearing back and provide clarity in loud environments.
  • What can cause sensorineural hearing loss?
    1. Ageing: Age-related hearing loss, known as presbycusis, is a common cause of sensorineural hearing loss. As people get older, the hair cells in the inner ear that detect sound waves gradually become damaged or die, resulting in hearing loss. 2. Exposure to loud noise: Also known as noise induced hearing loss, such as at concerts, noise exposure at work such as drilling or loud machinery, or listening to music through headphones at high volumes. These exposures for extended periods of time can cause permanent damage to the hair cells in the inner ear. 3. Infections: Certain viral or bacterial infections, such as meningitis, mumps, or cytomegalovirus (CMV). 4. Genetics: Sensorineural hearing loss can be caused by genetic factors, including inherited hearing loss disorders such as Usher syndrome and otosclerosis. 5. Ototoxic drugs: Certain medications, such as some chemotherapy drugs, antibiotics, and paracetamol taken in high doses, can cause sensorineural hearing loss as a side effect. 6. Head injury: Traumatic head injuries can damage the auditory nerve or the hair cells in the inner ear, leading to hearing loss. 7. Meniere's disease: Meniere's disease is a condition that affects the inner ear and can cause vertigo, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), and hearing loss. 8. Acoustic neuroma: Acoustic neuroma is a rare non-cancerous tumour that develops on the auditory nerve, which can cause hearing loss.
  • What are hearing aids, and how do they work?
    Hearing aids are small electronic devices designed to amplify sound for people with hearing loss. The basic function of hearing aids is to capture sounds through a microphone, process them with a digital signal processor, and transmit them through a speaker to the ear canal. This allows people with hearing loss to hear sounds that they might not otherwise be able to detect.
  • Is there a link between dementia and hearing loss?
    Recent research has uncovered a strong correlation between hearing loss and dementia. A study published in the Journal of the Medical Association (JAMA) found that people with moderate hearing loss are three times more likely to develop dementia than those with normal hearing. Another study in The Lancet reported that addressing hearing loss early on could prevent up to 9% of dementia cases. The reasons for this connection is that hearing loss can lead to changes in the brain. When hearing is impaired, the brain has to work harder to process sounds, which can lead to cognitive decline over time. Untreated hearing loss can also lead to social isolation, which has been shown to increase the risk of developing dementia by up to 50%. Moreover, hearing loss and dementia share many common risk factors, including age, genetics, and exposure to loud noises. Both conditions are also more prevalent among older adults. Around 466 million people worldwide have a degree of hearing loss, with the majority of cases occurring in people over the age of 65. Addressing hearing loss early on could have a significant impact on reducing the risk of developing dementia. Regular hearing tests and appropriate interventions, such as hearing aids, can help to maintain cognitive function and reduce the risk of social isolation, depression, and other factors that contribute to dementia.
  • How long does it take to get custom ear moulds made?
    The process for getting custom ear moulds made typically takes 1-2 weeks, depending on the complexity of the mould. Our audiologists will take impressions of your ears in the first appointment, which are then sent to a lab to be crafted into custom moulds.
  • Can I use a hearing aid in only one ear?
    Yes, it is possible to use a hearing aid if you only have one functioning ear. A hearing aid can help improve the ability to hear in that specific ear and can also help with balance.
  • What are the treatment options for hearing loss?
    The best and most common treatment for hearing loss include hearing aids. In some cases, medication or surgery may also be recommended. The best treatment option will depend on the type and severity of hearing loss which can be assessed by our audiologist. Below FAQs are further treatment options.
  • Is hearing loss hereditary?
    Hearing loss can be hereditary, meaning it can be passed down from one generation to the next. However, other factors such as aging, noise exposure, and medical conditions can also contribute to hearing loss.
  • What happens during a professional earwax removal?
    During a professional earwax removal, firstly an audiologist or ear specialists will examine the ear canal using specialised equipment . They will then use a gentle suction through our microsuction method to remove excess earwax or other build-up from the ear canal. This process is typically quick and painless and should only take up to 20 minutes.
  • How do I know if I have earwax? Common Symptoms
    Earache or pain: If the earwax buildup becomes too much, it can cause pressure in the ear canal leading to discomfort or pain. Reduced hearing: A buildup of earwax can block the ear canal and cause temporary hearing loss. Tinnitus: Tinnitus refers to a ringing, buzzing, or hissing sound in the ear. In some cases, excessive earwax can lead to tinnitus. Dizziness or vertigo: In rare cases, earwax buildup can cause dizziness or vertigo due to the pressure it places on the ear canal. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it is recommended that you schedule an appointment with our audiologist for an earwax examination and potential removal. It is important not to attempt to remove earwax on your own using cotton swabs or other objects, as this can push the wax further into the ear canal and potentially cause damage.
  • How to prepare for an earwax removal
    Preparing for an earwax removal is simple and easy, we recommend using natural olive oil drops or spray 1-3 days prior, this softens the wax for removal - this will prevent you from coming back for follow up appointments. Each ear should be oiled every morning and evening 2-3 drops, this may feel a little more blocked at first as the wax is expanding and softening but not to worry as this is completely normal. ​ You may usually be told that earwax will come out by itself with olive oil, however this can usually cause a further blockage, earwax should only be removed by an ear specialist as the eardrum is very delicate.
  • What are the risks of improper earwax removal?
    Improper earwax removal can lead to a number of potential risks and complications. This can include pushing the earwax further into the ear canal, causing blockage and potential damage to the ear drum. It can also lead to infections, inflammation, and other discomforts such as pain, dizziness, and ringing in the ears.
  • How much does professional earwax removal cost?
    At our clinic, the cost of earwax removal is £70, which includes the consultation and removal if wax is present. However, if no wax is present, there is a £30 consultation fee and no other hidden charges.
  • How often should I have my ears cleaned by a professional?
    The frequency of professional ear cleaning can vary depending on individual needs and lifestyle. In general, it is recommended to have a professional ear cleaning performed once every 6 to 12 months. However, those with excessive earwax build-up or other ear-related issues may require more frequent cleanings.
  • Why do we need earwax?
    Earwax, also known as cerumen, is naturally produced in the ear canal. It is a combination of secretions of the glands in the skin along with dead skin cells, hair, and dust. Earwax serves an important purpose in the ear: Protection: Earwax acts as a protective barrier for the delicate skin of the ear canal. It helps to keep the skin moisturised and prevents water, bacteria, and other foreign particles from entering the ear. Lubrication: The oily consistency of earwax helps to keep the ear canal lubricated and prevents it from becoming dry and itchy. Antibacterial properties: Earwax contains lysozyme, an enzyme that has antibacterial properties and helps to protect the ear against infection. In most cases, the body is able to produce the right amount of earwax to keep the ear canal healthy and clean. However, in some cases, excessive earwax can accumulate and cause symptoms
  • Understanding Earwax: Functions and Importance
    Earwax, also known as cerumen, is a natural substance that helps to protect the ear canal from dirt, bacteria, and other foreign particles. In the UK, it is estimated that around 1 in 10 people experience problems with earwax buildup at some point in their lives. Earwax buildup can cause symptoms such as earache, tinnitus, dizziness, and temporary hearing loss. Using cotton swabs or other objects to clean the ear canal can push earwax further into the ear which can cause more problems. The most common treatment for earwax buildup in the UK is ear drops, which can soften the wax and make it easier for an audiologist to remove. In some cases, water irrigation may be recommended by a healthcare professional to remove excessive earwax which is stubborn and hard to move. Certain factors, such as wearing hearing aids, earphones or using earplugs regularly, may increase the risk of earwax buildup. People with narrow or curvy ear canals may be more prone to earwax buildup. In rare cases, earwax buildup may be a sign of an underlying condition, such as a perforated eardrum. Regular cleaning of the outer ear with a damp cloth or tissue is usually sufficient to prevent excessive earwax buildup in most people.
  • Can I prevent earwax build-up?
    Yes, there are several ways to prevent earwax build-up. This includes avoiding using cotton swabs or other objects to clean the ear canal, as this can push the earwax further in and cause blockage. Regularly cleaning the outer ear with a damp cloth can also help to prevent build-up. Additionally, avoiding exposure to loud noises and keeping the ears dry can help to reduce the risk of developing excessive earwax.
  • Can earwax cause vertigo or dizziness?
    Yes, earwax buildup can potentially cause vertigo in some cases. Earwax can lead to a range of symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus, and dizziness or vertigo. This occurs when the earwax blocks the ear canal and interferes with the normal functioning of the inner ear, which is responsible for maintaining balance and spatial orientation. Additionally, an earwax impaction can create pressure on the eardrum, which can also affect balance and cause vertigo. If you are experiencing vertigo or other symptoms related to earwax buildup, it is important to see an audiologist for a diagnosis and treatment plan. This may involve earwax removal by a trained professional, our audiologist can make this procedure quick and pain-free.
  • Can I remove earwax at home?
    Removing earwax at home can be dangerous and should not be attempted: Risk of injury: using cotton swabs, bobby pins, or other objects can push the wax further into the ear canal. Often objects can get stuck in the ear canal, we have successfully removed cotton buds and headphone buds. Ineffective: Cotton swabs and other objects may not be effective at removing earwax, and can instead pack the wax deeper into the ear canal, leading to further complications. Masking underlying conditions: Some earwax removal methods, such as ear candles, can actually mask underlying conditions by removing only superficial wax and not addressing more serious issues that may be causing symptoms. Unsanitary: Using unsanitary objects to remove earwax can introduce bacteria into the ear, potentially leading to infection. If you are experiencing symptoms of excessive earwax, such as an earache, reduced hearing, tinnitus, or dizziness, it is important to seek professional earwax removal from an audiologist or ear specialist. They will be able to examine your ears and determine the best course of treatment to safely and effectively remove the wax.
  • Is there a link between tinnitus and anxiety or depression
    Yes, there is a link between tinnitus and anxiety or depression. Many people with tinnitus report feeling anxious or depressed, and these conditions can also worsen tinnitus symptoms. Seeking treatment for anxiety or depression can be helpful in managing tinnitus.
  • Is tinnitus a sign of hearing loss?
    Yes, tinnitus can be a sign of hearing loss. In fact, the majority of people with tinnitus also have some degree of hearing loss. This is because damage to the inner ear from loud noise exposure or aging can cause both tinnitus and hearing loss.
  • Tinnitus Treatments and Therapy
    Hearing aids: For people with hearing loss, hearing aids can help to amplify external sounds and reduce the need for the brain to make up it's own sounds. Sound therapy: This can involve using a white noise machine or other device that produces calming sounds to mask or reduce the perception of tinnitus. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT): This is a type of therapy that helps people learn how to manage the emotional and psychological impact of tinnitus, and can help to reduce stress and anxiety related to the condition. Medications: Some medications may be prescribed to manage the symptoms of tinnitus, such as antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications. Tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT): This is a type of therapy that involves a combination of sound therapy and counseling to help people learn to habituate to the sound of tinnitus and reduce its impact on their daily lives. Lifestyle changes: Reducing exposure to loud noise, avoiding stimulants such as caffeine and nicotine, and managing stress can help to reduce the severity of tinnitus. It is important to note that there is no single "cure" for tinnitus, and that the most effective treatment will vary depending on the individual and the underlying cause of the condition. It is recommended to speak with an audiologist to determine the most appropriate treatment options for your specific situation.
  • Can stress make tinnitus worse?
    Yes, stress can make tinnitus worse. In fact, many people report that their tinnitus symptoms become more noticeable during times of high stress. Learning stress reduction techniques, such as meditation or yoga, can be helpful in managing tinnitus symptoms.
  • Tinnitus facts in the UK
    It is estimated that around 6 million people in the UK experience tinnitus to some degree. Tinnitus can affect people of all ages, but it is more common in adults over 50 years old. Exposure to loud noises is the most common cause of tinnitus in the UK, with approximately 75% of cases being caused by noise exposure. Other causes of tinnitus in the UK include ear infections, certain medications, and underlying health conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes. In the UK, tinnitus is the most common service-related injury reported by military personnel. People with tinnitus in the UK may also experience hearing loss or hyperacusis (sensitivity to loud sounds). While there is no cure for tinnitus, the British Tinnitus Association recommends several management techniques, including sound therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, and relaxation techniques. Tinnitus can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life, and may lead to depression, anxiety, or sleep disturbances. In some cases, tinnitus can be a sign of a more serious underlying condition, such as a tumour or aneurysm, although this is rare. The economic cost of tinnitus in the UK is estimated to be around £750 million per year, including healthcare costs and lost productivity.
  • What causes tinnitus?
    Tinnitus can be caused by a variety of factors, including exposure to loud noises, ear infections, hearing loss, head injuries, and certain medications. In some cases, tinnitus may be a symptom of an underlying medical condition such as Meniere's disease or acoustic neuroma.
  • Relation between Tinnitus and Hearing Loss
    Tinnitus is often associated with hearing loss, and approximately 80% of people with tinnitus also have some degree of hearing loss. Hearing loss can cause changes in the brain that lead to tinnitus. Age-related hearing loss, also known as presbycusis, is a common cause of tinnitus in older adults. Exposure to loud noise, such as from music, machinery, or firearms, can cause both hearing loss and tinnitus. Certain medications, such as certain antibiotics, chemotherapy drugs, and loop diuretics, can cause both hearing loss and tinnitus as side effects.
  • Can tinnitus be cured?
    There is currently no known cure for tinnitus, but there are treatments available that can help manage the symptoms. These may include sound therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, hearing aids or medications.
  • What lifestyle changes can help manage tinnitus?
    Making certain lifestyle changes can help manage tinnitus symptoms. These may include avoiding exposure to loud noises, getting regular exercise, and reducing stress. A healthy diet and regular sleep schedule can also be beneficial. However, if tinnitus is due to hearing loss, it can get worse overtime so it is important to get an initial hearing test.
  • Benefits of using hearing aids to treat tinnitus
    1. Reduced perception of tinnitus: Hearing aids can help to amplify external sounds and reduce tinnitus, making it easier to cope with the condition on a daily basis. 2. Improved hearing: For people with hearing loss, hearing aids can improve the ability to hear speech and other sounds, which can reduce the impact of tinnitus on communication and social interactions. 3. Customisable settings: Many hearing aids come with customisable settings that allow users to adjust the volume, frequency, and other parameters to better manage their tinnitus symptoms. 4. Increased comfort: Some hearing aids come with additional features that can help to reduce discomfort associated with tinnitus, such as noise reduction, sound masking, or built-in tinnitus therapy programs. 5. Improved quality of life: By reducing the impact of tinnitus on daily activities and social interactions, hearing aids can improve overall quality of life and reduce feelings of stress, anxiety, and depression associated with the condition. It is important to note that not all hearing aids are created equal, and that the most effective treatment will depend on the individual and the underlying cause of the tinnitus. It is recommended to consult with an audiologist to determine the most appropriate treatment options for your specific situation.
  • How is tinnitus diagnosed?
    Tinnitus is typically diagnosed through a comprehensive hearing evaluation, which includes a physical examination, hearing tests, and a review of medical history. An audiologist may also order additional tests, such as an MRI or CT scan, to rule out any underlying medical conditions.
  • Is there a link between tinnitus and vertigo?
    Yes, there can be a link between tinnitus and vertigo, although not everyone with tinnitus experiences vertigo, and vice versa. Vertigo is a type of dizziness characterised by a sense of spinning or movement, often accompanied by nausea and loss of balance. The underlying causes of both conditions can overlap, such as inner ear disorders or neurological conditions. For example, Meniere's disease, a disorder of the inner ear that can cause vertigo and hearing loss, is often associated with tinnitus. In some cases, the symptoms of tinnitus and vertigo can be treated together using similar approaches, such as vestibular rehabilitation therapy or cognitive behavioural therapy. If you are experiencing tinnitus or vertigo, it is important to see an audiologist or medical consultant for a diagnosis and treatment plan.
  • Can hearing aids improve my hearing in noisy environments?
    Some hearing aids come with features specifically designed to improve hearing in noisy environments, such as directional microphones and noise reduction technology. However, it is important to remember that hearing aids cannot completely eliminate background noise.
  • Can I use a hearing aid in only one ear?
    Yes, it is possible to use a hearing aid if you only have one functioning ear. A hearing aid can help improve the ability to hear in that specific ear and can also help with balance.
  • What are the different types of hearing aids?
    There are several types of hearing aids available on the market, including: Behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids: These hearing aids sit behind the ear and are connected to a custom ear mold by a tube. They are suitable for all degrees of hearing loss. In-the-ear (ITE) hearing aids: These hearing aids sit inside the ear and are custom-made to fit the shape of the ear. They are suitable for mild to severe hearing loss. Receiver-in-canal (RIC) hearing aids: These hearing aids are similar to BTE hearing aids, but the speaker is located inside the ear canal. They are suitable for mild to severe hearing loss. Completely-in-canal (CIC) hearing aids: These hearing aids are small and fit entirely inside the ear canal. They are suitable for mild to moderate hearing loss.
  • What are hearing aids, and how do they work?
    Hearing aids are small electronic devices designed to amplify sound for people with hearing loss. The basic function of hearing aids is to capture sounds through a microphone, process them with a digital signal processor, and transmit them through a speaker to the ear canal. This allows people with hearing loss to hear sounds that they might not otherwise be able to detect.
  • What should I look for when choosing a hearing aid?
    When choosing a hearing aid, there are several factors to consider, including: Degree and type of hearing loss Lifestyle and communication needs Comfort and fit Features and technology, such as Bluetooth connectivity and directional microphones Price and insurance coverage Our audiologist would be able to recommend the best hearing aid for your specific needs and hearing loss after conducting a hearing test.
  • How long does it take to adjust to wearing hearing aids?
    It can take some time to adjust to wearing hearing aids. Initially, sounds may seem too loud or distorted, but over time, the brain will adjust to the new sounds. On average, it can take anywhere from 2-4 weeks to fully adjust to wearing hearing aids.
  • What is the price of a hearing aid and what's included?
    The price of a hearing aid can vary depending on various factors, such as the degree and type of hearing loss, the level of technology and features required, and personal lifestyle choices and budget. For example, someone with mild hearing loss may require a basic hearing aid, while someone with severe hearing loss and an active lifestyle may benefit from a more advanced device with wireless connectivity and noise reduction features. At our audiology clinic, we offer a range of hearing aids from various manufacturers at different price points to suit different needs and budgets. Our hearing aid prices include a comprehensive hearing assessment, customised fitting and programming of the device, and a 8 week trial period to ensure the hearing aid meets your expectations. All future hearing test, programming and unlimited home visits will also be included. We also provide ongoing support and maintenance services to ensure your hearing aids continue to function optimally. Please contact us to schedule a consultation and learn more about our hearing aid options and pricing.
  • Can hearing aids be repaired if they are damaged?
    Yes, hearing aids can typically be repaired if they are damaged depending on the level of severity of damage. All hearing aids come with 5 years manufacturers warranty and this will cover any non-accidental issues the hearing aid has during that time.
  • How often do I need to have my hearing aids serviced or cleaned?
    Hearing aids should be serviced and cleaned regularly to ensure they are functioning properly as sometimes the wax guards can be blocked with earwax. It is recommended to have hearing aids serviced every 6 months to a year, depending on the manufacturer's and audiologist's recommendations.
  • How do I know if I need a hearing aid?
    You may need a hearing aid if you experience any of the following symptoms: Difficulty understanding speech, particularly in noisy environments Frequently asking others to repeat themselves Turning up the volume on the TV or radio Avoiding social situations because of difficulty hearing If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should consult an audiologist to have an initial hearing test.
  • What types of hearing loss can be prevented with ear moulds?
    Ear moulds can help prevent both temporary and permanent hearing loss. Temporary hearing loss, also known as noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), can occur after exposure to loud noises and is usually reversible. Permanent hearing loss can occur after prolonged exposure to loud noises and is usually irreversible.
  • How often should I replace my custom ear moulds?
    We recommend replacing your custom ear moulds every 2-5 years, depending on how frequently they are used and how well they are maintained. Regular cleaning and inspection can help prolong the lifespan of your moulds.
  • How can I tell if I have hearing loss?
    Signs of hearing loss can include difficulty understanding conversations, ringing (tinnitus) or buzzing in the ears, and asking others to repeat themselves frequently. Our audiologists can perform a hearing assessment to determine the extent of any hearing loss and recommend appropriate treatment and protection.
  • What are custom ear moulds made of?
    Our custom ear moulds are made of medical-grade silicone, which is hypoallergenic and comfortable to wear. The moulds are custom-fit to your ear canal for maximum protection and comfort.
  • Can custom ear moulds be used for swimming?
    Yes, we offer custom ear moulds specifically designed for swimming. These moulds create a watertight seal in the ear, preventing water from entering and reducing the risk of ear infections.
  • How do I clean my custom ear moulds?
    Regular cleaning of your custom ear moulds is important to maintain their effectiveness and prolong their lifespan. Use a mild soap and warm water to clean the moulds, and avoid using harsh chemicals or abrasive materials. Our audiologists can provide more detailed instructions for cleaning and maintenance.
  • How do I know if I need custom ear protection?
    If you work in a noisy environment, participate in loud activities, or experience discomfort or ringing in your ears after exposure to loud sounds, you may benefit from custom ear protection. Our audiologists can perform a hearing assessment and recommend the best protection for your needs.
  • Can using ear moulds help prevent hearing loss?
    Yes, ear moulds can help prevent hearing loss by reducing the amount of noise that reaches your ears. Exposure to loud noises is a common cause of hearing loss, so using custom ear moulds can provide effective protection and help preserve your hearing.
  • Can I wear ear moulds if I already have hearing loss?
    Yes, custom ear moulds can be used by those who already have hearing loss to help prevent further damage and preserve existing hearing. Our audiologists can recommend the best ear moulds for your specific needs.

Treatments for Hearing Loss

Once we have conducted a hearing test, the audiologist will be able to determine the type and severity of your hearing loss. Depending on the results, there are several treatment options available for hearing loss.

 

1. One of the most common treatments for hearing loss is the use of hearing aids, which can help amplify sounds and improve speech understanding.

 

2. Earwax removal may also be necessary in some cases, as excessive earwax can block the ear canal and cause hearing loss.

3. If your hearing loss is caused by an infection or allergy, medicine such as antibiotics or antihistamines may be prescribed by the GP.

4. In more severe cases of hearing loss, cochlear implants or bone anchored hearing systems may be recommended. Cochlear implants are electronic devices that are surgically implanted into the inner ear to stimulate the auditory nerve, while bone anchored hearing systems are implantable devices that conduct sound through the bones in the skull. Ultimately, the best treatment option for your hearing loss will depend on the type and severity of your condition, as well as your personal preferences and lifestyle needs.

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Why Choose Us?

Our team consists of highly trained and certified audiologists with years of experience in hearing aids and wax removal. Every procedure is performed with the utmost precision and care.

Our audiologists regularly attend workshops, seminars, and training sessions to stay updated with the latest advancements in audiology and ear care.

We understand that every patient is unique. Whether you're visiting us for a routine check-up or a specific ear issue, we tailor our approach to meet your individual needs.

We stay ahead of the curve by investing in the newest and most advanced technology as soon as it becomes available. This ensures that our patients receive the highest standard of care using the safest and most effective methods.

We take the time to explain each step of the procedure, allowing you to understand what to expect and why it’s necessary. We are completely transparent in all of our procedures.

We recognize that some patients may feel anxious about earwax removal. Our team is trained to provide a calming and reassuring environment, ensuring that even the most nervous patients feel at ease.

Let us contact you

Main Office:

75 Tottenham Ln, London

N8 9BE, UK

0208 341 0588

0203 488 7783

We will be in contact very shortly

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